Skip to main content

Full text of "Trees and plants for the world out of doors"

See other formats


f 




Class. 
Book. 






CopyiightN^ 



COPWIGHT DEPOSIT. 



LIBRARY ol CONGRESS 

APR 28 ltt09 



cuss 3_ I^^t "cc 



INTRODUCTION 



It is with much pride that we issue this magnificent collection of illuminated 
illustrations of some of the choicest varieties or fruits, trees, shrubs and hardy 
flowers. 

Never before has there been produced any collection of a like nature for 
commercial purposes. No expense has been spared to obtain the best possible 
results of artistic skill in producing effects absolutely true to nature. 

The originals for each and e\ ery plate are studies from nature by the famous 
water-color artist, Mr. A. Lunzer of New York City and represent manj- months 
labor on his part in securing his subjects and portraying them. 

For nearly three years, the artists of the Stecher Lithographic Company of 
Rochester, N. Y., have been engaged in the reproduction of Mr. Lunzer s 
paintings for our sole use in the compilation of this volume and we feel that it has 
been most faithfully done. ^Ve gi\e particular credit to Mr. Thos. F. Brown, 
of said Company, who has looked after all details during this time. 

We believe that upon consideration of the high class work in every detail in 
the production of this book, we have just claim to ha\'ing achieved the acme of 
perfection in Plate Book st^le. 

^\ e know it will be found very instructive and most enlightening on the 
beauties of nature as found in her products that are here shown; there are no ex- 
aggerations of size or color. ^\ e can supply stock of fruits, trees, shrubs or 
flowers that will produce specimens equal to any iUustrated here. 

It will also pro\ e to be in\'aluable in its assistance in making selections for 
orders. We can always be relied on to supply any of the varieties included here 
in high grade quality' of stock. 

We call particular attention to the grand showing of the beautiful hardy per- 
ennials and bulbs in the latter part of the book. We cannot say too much in 
urging the increased use of these splendid old-fashioned flowers; they cost but 
little, require but little care and constantly improve with age. No order-list 
should be complete without some of these. 

It is necessarily impossible to illustrate, in a book of this character, more 
than a small number of the almost unlimited varieties of fruits, trees, shrubs and 
flowers that are grown by us in our se\ eral niuseries. ^Ve have, howe\ er, made 
a careful selection for this purpose of the best of such sorts as we have found in 
our forty years experience to be wholly desirable. 

There are, too, many other varieties that are illustrated and described fuUy 
in our new 1909 catalogue, which embraces all varieties of fruits and ornamentals 
grown by us. This means a complete list of all fruits, trees and plants known to 
horticulmrists that can be successfully grown in this latitude. 

For many years, we ha\ e been growing and supolymg a large proportion of 
the fruit stock planted in this famous fruit section of the Lake Region. During 
this time, we have been constantly adding varieties of deciduous ornamentals and 
evergreens. We have over 1200 acres of nurser>- stock and 50,000 square feet 
of glass for propagation. ^Ve grow and can supply any known hardy plant, tree 
or shrub. 

Our extensive storage and packing cellars enable us to ship goods earlier and 
later than would otherwise be possible, as we pack all goods under cover. All 
orders, large or small, have equally prompt and careful attention ; all shipments 
are carefully inspected and checked and ever}- means taken to a\ oid errors and to 
give perfect satisfaction to our patrons. 

^Ve solicit and will appreciate continued patronage and extend our compli- 
ments. Very truly, 

BROWN BROTHERS CO.MP.ANY'. 

Copyright 




Scenes from extensive office grounds — Formal garden 
— ^Artificial Lake — Drives, with border of J5aby Rambler 
Roses, large expanse of lawn, etc. 




Further scenes fron 
office grounds and nur- 
series adjoining. 




Scenes at packing cellars; tieing up trees, wrapping shrubs and Roses, boxing sliipments, etc. 
All done under cover. 




1. Apple, Crimson Beauty 

2. ^' North Star. 




1. Apple, Boiken 

2. ' Arctic. 




1. Apple, Ontario. 

2. Jonathan 




1. Apj^le, Duchess of Oldenburg. 

2. ^^ Yellow Transparent. 

3. ' Wealthy. 




1. Apple, Golden Sweet. 

2. " Talmon Sweet. 

3. " Bailey Sweet. 

4. " Sweet Bough. 



1. Apple, Mcintosh Red. 

2. Grimes Golden 




g*S^»^ 




-'^.S'^t-in^tet 



1. Apple, Baxter 

2. Stark. 





1. Apple, Pewaukee. 

2. ' Century. 




Crab Apple, Martha. 

General Grant. 
Large Red Siberian 
Hyslop. 

Yellow Siberian. 
Van Wyck Sweet. 




1. Pear, Clapp's Favorite 

2. " Fayette Beauty. 




1. Pear, Seckel. 

2. [^ Bartlett. 

3. Duchess d'Angouleme. 

4. " Kieffer. 



12 




1. Plum, Abundance. 

2. Burbank. 

3. German Prune. 

4. October Purple. 



13 




1. Plum, French or Italian Prune. 

2. Moore's Arctic. 

3. Hungarian Prune. 

4. Niagara. 




1. Plum, Imperial Gage. 

2. Shropshire Damson. 

3. Lombard 

4. Maynard. 

5. Yellow Egfr. 




1. Cherrj', Black Tartarian 



2. 


Yellow Spanish. 


3. 


Windsor. 


4. 


Large Montmorency. 


5. 


Early Richmond. 


6. 


Napoleon Bigarreau. 



16 




1. Peach, Crosby. 

2. '^'^ Elberta. 

3. " Triumph. Our Klondyke Collection. 



17 




1. Peach, Mayflower. 

2. Indian Cling. 

3. Champion. 




1. Quince, Rca's MammotI 

2. " Meech's Prolific, 

3. " Orange. 

4. " Champion. 



19 




1. Apricot, St. Ambroise. 

2. Montgamc;t. 

3. " Early Golden. 



20 




1. Grapes, Niagara. 

2. ' Moore's Early, 



21 




1. Grape, Brighton. 

2. Concord. 



22 




1. Grape, Agawan 

2. Lindley. 

3. Salem. 

4. , " Wilder. 



23 




1. Grape, Green Mountain. 

2. Campbell's Early. 



24 




1. Raspberry, Golden Queen. 

2. " Black Diamond. 

3. Columbian. 

4. ' Cumberland. 




1. 


Blackberry, Snyder. 


4. 


Raspberry, Cuthbert. 


2. 


Erie. 


5. 


Herbert. 


3. 


Ancient Briton. 


6. 


Ohio. 



26 




-i 



1. Blackberry, Rathbun 

2. Gooseberry, Houghton, 

3. Downing. 




% 



27 




The Ward Blackberry. 




1. Currant, White Grape. 3. Currant, Perfection. 

2. " Black Champion. 4. " Fay's ProUfic. 



29 




1. Asparagus, Conover's Colossal. 

2. Rhubarb, Myatt's Linnaeus. 



30 




1. Strawberry, Great Scott. 

2. ' Brandywine. 

3. " Glen Mary. 

4. Oregon Everbearing. 

5. Ryckman. 



31 



Black Walnut. 




American Sweet Chestnut 



NUT BEARING TREES. 



1. 






'' " >J#^^';^^ *" 



,^^^i^l^^::^^;;"U 4^ 



>« <-' 






^ >* 



jti-m '. - 



u>^ 






.' » *. 



'f^ ,. 






A -%.. 
^f^ ^ ,^^-^ 



\ 




1. Willow, Wisconsin Weeping (Salix Babylonica var). 

2. " Laurel-leaved (Salix laurifolia). 

3. Maple, Silver (Acer dasycarpum) . 

4. " Norway (Acer platahoides) . 



33 







1. Elm, American (Ulmus Americana). 

2. Beech, Purple (Fagus Sylvatica Purpurea). 

3. Elm, Camperdown (Ulmus Camperdown Pendula). 



Hj^^y 



en 






34 







1. \Viilnw Kilmarnock, (Salix caprea pendula > 

2. Catalpa, Common (Catalpa bignonioides). 

3. Mulberry, Tea's Weeping (Morus Tartarica pendula). 

4. Hedge, Honey Locust (Gleditschia triacanthos). 







35 



.^.:%;}fi■'<"'^--'^^^ - 




1. Salisburia, Maiden Hair or Gingko. (Salisburia adiantifolia). 

2. Catalpa, Chinese (Catalpa Bungeii). 

3. Dogwood, White (Cornus fiorida). 

4. " Red (Cornus florida flore rubra). 



36 



■** - "if 















Horse Chestnut, (Aesculus hippocastaneiirri). 

European Bird Cherry, (Prunus padus). 

Thorn, White (Crataegus oxyacantha flore pleno). 

Paul's New, (Crataegus oxyacantha coccinea flore pleno 
Paulii). 



37 







1. Mountain Ash, American. (Pyrus Sorbus Amencana). 

2. '• " " (Fruit) '• 

3. Poplar, Carolina, (Populus Carolina). 



.^a ^■^>ey^ 



-t-^y 



38 




1. Locust, Moss. -- Flower (Robinia hispida). 

2. Black. - - * (Robinia pseudo acacia). 

3. Laburnum or Golden Chain (Cytisus laburnum). 



-7?-^ 



tinier. 






7 



39 




. ^y t 



,,-^. 




1. Ivy, Boston or Japan (Ampelopsis Veitchii). 

2- Birch, Cut-leaf Weeping (Betula laciniata pendula). 

3. Hedge, California Privet (Ligustrum Ovalifolium). 
4- " Honey Locust (artistic trimming). 




]. Sumach, Staghorn & fmit TSummer) Rhus typhina. 

2- (Autumn) 

3- Cut-leaf with fruit (Rhus glabra laciniata). 



41 




1. Maple, Ash-leaved (Acer negundo fraxinifolium). 

2- Juniper, Irish (Juniperus communis Hibernica). 

3. Arbor Vitae, American (Thuya occidentaHs). 

4. Plane, Oriental (Piatanus orientalis). 




1. Juniper, Savin's (Juniperus Sabina). 

2. Pine, Mugho Dwarf (Pinus Mugho). 

3. Oak, Pin (Quercus palustris). 

4. Linden, American (Tillia Americana). 







43 



ir .-."yti 



«?;|s%^^*^^^' 




^^^ 
















1. Pine, White, (Pinus strobus 

2. Pine, Scotch, (Pinus sylvestns) * 

3. Fir, Nordmann's, (Abies Nordmanniann) 

4. Spruce, Norway, (Picea excelsa). 

5. Pine, Austrian, (Pinus Austriaca). 




1. Retinispora pisifera. 

2. ' plumosa aurea. 

3. " squarrosa. 

4. " filifera. 

5. Thuya occidentalis aurea. 




>>i^ 



45 



f, ■ - ^v * 




Sj-irLicc, Knstcr'.s IjIlk-, ' i''Cf;i piijiem-. Ko^tcnana). 



46 



( .^ 




Althaeas, Double White, Red, Pink and Purple. 



47 




1. Forsythia or Golden Bell (Forsythia viridissima). . 

2. Red Bud or Judas Tree ( Cercis canadensis). 

3. Double-flowering Plum or Rose Tree of China ( Amygdalus 

communis flore roseo pleno). 



48 




1. Lilac, Syringa vulearis, var. Madame Lemoine. 



Frau Dammann. 
Prince Camille de Rohann. 
Charles X. 
Rouge de Trianon. 
Ludwig Spaeth. 



49 







^ V 



M^ 







Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora. 



50 





1. Azalea mollis (Bush and Flower). 

2. amoena. 



51 




1. Deutzia, Pride of RocfeesWr. 

2. Snowberry, White (Symphoricarpus racemosus). 

2. a Red ( " vulgaris) 

3. Weigelia in variety (Diervilla Candida, rosea, etc. )• 

4. Kerria, Japanese (Kerria Japonica). 



52 




1. Mahonia or Ashbeny (Malmnia aquifolia). 

2. Currant, Flowering (Ribes aureuni). 

3. Spiraea, Thunbergs (Spiraea Thunbergii). 

4. Cranberry, High bush (Viburnum opulus). 



53 





















' , "', >■ 4'' ,^*■ "'J#f ."■-?■• .'>• ■ ^ •■'^ 






1. Japan Oleaster (Elaeagnus longipes). 

2. Thunberg's or Japan Barberry (Berberis Thunbergii). 



54 



• I 







1. Crab, Bechtel's Flowering (Pyrus angustifolia) . 

2. Deutzia crenata (Var rosea flora pleno). 

3. Spirasa Van Houttei. 

4. Cherry, Double-flowered (Cerasus avium flore alba plena). 



55 




1. Snowball, Japan (Viburnum plicatuni). 

2. Calycanthus or Sweet-scented shrub (Calycanthus floridus). 

3. Halesia, Snowdrop or Silver Bell (Halesia tetraptera). 



56 




Clematis, Heni7ii. 

Madame f'dward Andre. 
Jackmanni. 



57 




1. Clematis, Ramoiia. 

2. Duchess of Edinburgh. 

3. " Montana. 



58 




1. Clematis, Paniculata. 

2. ' Recta.. 

3. Yucca or Adams Needle (Yucca (ilamentosa). 






59 




1. Honeysuckle, Hall's Japan (Lonicera halleana). 

2. " Red and White Tartarian (Lonicera Tartarica). 



60 




f 'Cti^' 



-ii< ^in 



rijQr, 




1. Wistaria, Chinese Purple (Wistaria sinensis). 

2. " " White ( " " alba). 



61 




1. Hemerocallis or Day Lilly (Hemerocailis fulva). 

2. Doronicum or Leopard's Bane (Doronicum plantagineum). 

3. Primrose, Giant, (GEnothera glauca). 

4. Columbine, (Aquilegia coerulea (Blue), Canadensis Red, 

Chrysantha Yellow). 



62 




1. Columbine, (Aquilegia Haylodgensis) 

2. Aster, Cornflower (Stokesia cyanae): 

3. Oswesjo Tea or Horsemint, (Monarda didyma). 




1. Flame-Flower (Tritoma pfitzerii). 

2. Hardy Flowering Asters, in variety. 



64 




Hollyhocks, Perennial (assorted or by color) . 



65 




-tY. ^i^n?pr. 



Lilium, elegans atropurpureum. 
Batemanni. 
Speciosum rubrum. 
Tigrinum. 
Speciosum album. 



The Gem Collection of Lillies. 



66 




Digitalis or Foxglove. 

2. Canterbury Bell, (Campanula macrantha). 

3. " " ( " gigantea Moerheirni). 



67 




Gladiolus, lighter shades. 



68 




Pinks, Hardy Double — Assorted colors 



69 




1. Hardy Pink, (Dianthus Napoleon Third). 

2. Cardinal Flower, (Lobelia Victoriae). 

3. Beard Tongue, (Pentstemon, Sensation). 



70 




Larkspur, in various colors 



71 






W 





1. Phlox, Hardy, Miss Lingard. 



2. 


Jeanne d'Arc. 


3. 


Coquelicot. 


4. 


Euclaireur. 


5. 


Pantheon. 


6. 


Coccinea. 


7. 


Size of Flower. 



72 




1. Violets, Double English. 

2. ' Large Single Purple. 

3. " Single White. 

4. Candytuft, Hardy — (Iberis sempervirens) 

5. Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis). 



73 




1. Bleeding-Heart, (Dicentra spectabilis). 

2. " " White (Dicentra spectabilis albaj. 

3. Edleweis, (Leontopodium alpinum). 

4. Blue Gentian, (Gentiana acaulis). 



74 




1. Corn Flower, (Centaurea montana alba). 

2. False Chamonile, (Boltonia latisquama). 

3. Blanket Flower, (Gaillardia grandiflora). 

4. Perennial Sunflower, (Helianthus multiflorus maximus). 



75 




1. Dahlias, assorted colors. 

2. Cactus, assorted colors 



76 




Iris Japan. Three varieties 



11 




Campanula in variety, Canterbury Bell (Bellflower or Harebell). 



78 




1. Poppy, Oriental (Papaver orientale). 

2-3-4. ' Iceland, in variety (Papaver nudicaule). 



79 

















1. Chiysanthemum Maximum. 

2. False Dragon-Head (Physostegia Virginica). 

3. Blazing Star or Gay Feather (Liatris Pycnostachya) . 



80 




1. Perennial Pea (Lathyrus latifolius albiflorus). 

2. Golden Glow (Rudljeclcia laciniata fl. pi.)- 



•81 




id i\ * 



f ^n"^ 






' jL'^/ 







X 




■ ^Ji 




Shasta Daisies 



ig^_;'^ ^ r>^.^P» 



i«:5^ 





82 




Tulips, in variety. 



83 




1. Anemone or Windflower (Anemone Japonica rubra). 

2. ;; ;; ;; ( ;; " aiba). 

3- " ( " Queen Charlotte). 



84 






ay 




1. Spiraea, Douglas's (Spiraea Douglasii). 

2. "Japan Spiraea" (Astilbe Davidii). 

3. Hardy Fern, (Scolopendrium undulatum). 



85 



/isS.'-a^ 2. 




1. Paeonia, Herbaceous, (P. officinalis, var Pomponia). 

2. '' \\ (P. '] '[ The Mikado). 

3. " " (P. " " Festiva). 




1. Paeonia, Herbaceous, (P. officinalis, var. Rosea). 

2. " " (P. " " Rubra). 

3. " " (P. " " Edouard Andre). 



87 




Paeonia festiva maxima. 





1. Plume Grass (Erianthus ravenn;e). 

2. Great Reed (Arundo donax). 

3. Japanese Grass (Eulalia gracillima univittata). 

4. T^bra Grass (Eulalia Japonica zebrina). 



89 





90 




1. Rose, Sweet Brier, The old-fashioned variety. 

2. " Tausendschon, A great climber. 

3. " Baby Rambler, Ever-blooming. 




\\ ith border of Baby Rambler 



92 




1. Rose, Madame Caioline' Testout. 

2. ' Eugene Furst. 

3. " Frau Karl Druschki. 

4. Baron de Bonstetten. 



/ 



93 




1. Rose, Mrs. J. H. Laing. 

2. ' LaFrance. 

3. " Louise Van Houtte 

4. Margaret Dickson. 



94 




1. Rose, Gen. Jacqueminot. 

2. \\ Clio. 

3. Madame Gabriel Luizet 

4. " Marshall P. Wilder. 



95 



\ 




1. Rose, Coquette des Alps. 

2. " Ulrich Brunner. 

3. " Paul Neyron. 

4. " Earl of Dufferin. 



96 




1- Rose, Solid D'Oi. '* 

2- ' Anne de Diesbach. 

3- Harrisons Yellow. 

4. ^^ Marchioness of Londonderry 

5. ' Prince Camille de Rohan. 



97 




1. Rose, Crimson Rambler. ^ 

2. " Dorothy Perkins. 

3. " Baltimore Belle. 

4. " Queen of the Prairie. 




1. Rose, Crested Moss: 

2. " Princess Adelaide 

3. " Blanche Moreau. 



I 7 



99 




1. Rose, Rugosa alba. 

2. " Rugosa rubra, 

3. Wichuriana. 



100 




Crimson Rambler Branch and Flower. 



Landscape Department, 

Engineering, Designing and Constructio7i. 

This department, located right here in our own general offices and conducted by skilled and 
experienced men, is fully equipped with draughting and blue-printing rooms, surveying instru- 
ments and appliances, a reference library and every facility for treating with all matters 
appertaining to landscape development of any extent. 

It is maintained for the benefit of our patrons, expressly to overcome the high rates for pro- 
fessional services that would, otherwise, have to be paid and places artistic and scientific 
landscape advice within the reach of all. It will cheerfully give advice and suggestions for the 
proper location of buildings, walks, drives, gardens, plantings of trees and plants. The depart- 
ment is thoroughly familiar with climatic conditions in different sections of the country and 
can intelligently advise what varieties of ornamental trees and plants are suitable to plant in any 
locality. 

Our method of treatment of properties or grounds of medium size is as follows: First, 
we request that our agent, or the ow^ner, give us the dimensions of the property to be treated, 
with all possible information regarding the grades, contours of the land and points of the 
compass; give outlines and dimensions of buildings, locating doors and windows and giving 
distance of buildings from front or back and side property lines; location of walks and drives, if 
any, and their width ; indicate location of any existing trees or shrubs and all objects that are 
essential to give us a comprehensive idea of the situation. This will enable us to then make a 
plan, drawn to scale, that will show just where all improvements are to be located. The 
arrangement of proposed plantings are shown by key numbers. A list accompanies this plan, 
giving names of varieties of plants, their key numbers and the quantities to be used. 

We also submit with this an estimate of the cost of the stock necessary for our plan, on 
which, by grouping in this way, we are able to make a much lower price than could be obtained 
in any other way. 

By this method and the guidance of our plan the owner may carry out the work under his 
own direction or have it executed by a local gardener, but getting the benefit of our expert 
advice and design. 

We are giving special attention to the designing of formal and old fashioned gardens in 
infinite variety. These gardens offer opportunities for planting quantities of all the beautiful 
perennials in masses which, when properly arranged, will afford a harmony of color and succes- 
sion of bloom from early Spring to late Fall with an abundance of flowers for cutting throughout 
that period. Nearly every property has some ground in a warm, sunny location that could be 
well utilized for this purpose and thereby lend additional interest and pleasure to the home. 

In regard to larger properties, the development of parks, cemeteries and extensive private 
estates which require personal inspection, we will send a representative of this department in 
consultation, charging only actual cost of time and expenses involved in such visits. 

We are constantly receiving commendations from our patrons all over the country who have 
availed themselves of the advantages offered by this department. Undeveloped grounds have 
been improved in appearance and their values increased; ugly backyards have been transformed 
into attractive retreats during the summer months and vines grown on previously staring blank 
walls. No place is too small, if there is any room for planting, to be considered for landscape 
treatment. There is no limit to the advantages to be derived from a correspondence with us on 
this subject of landscape work. 

We will help you to improve your grounds, whether old or new, by showing how and what 
to plant to produce unbroken expanses of lawn, vistas, interesting views from given points, to 
enhance or reduce apparent distances and height and to make of the whole place a complete 
pleasing picture instead of an indiscriminate mass. 



/r<?/h ^//-e^ 



O 



^N /^ooi "/ ^ahge Zv'/?; Tree 5 



^P 



^/O^e \tya/^ 



/6oY/^t/ 7^r-a/7-r 










/6.0' ^t. ^'<9^« 
PLAN No. 1. 

Sketch of property as sent in by one of our agents and giving information for a landscape 
plan, b\it not drawn to any scale. 




Bc/^i_E zo'- r ° } 



Preliminary sketch of Plan No. 1, drawn to scale, indicating proposed landscape treatment, 
submitted to ovraer for approval. 




nAin 



<5TnE.E.-r 



-SCAUE. 2.0'' I" 



PLAN No. 3. 



Detailed planting plan to develop design of Plan No. 2, upon its acceptance by owner. 
Gives location and quantities of plants, named on a planting list, which accompanies each plan. 



?.'?■